A MILESTONE IN GREAT LAKES MARITIME HISTORY MARKS AN ANNIVERSARY.

THE EDMUND FITZGERALD.

Today is the 35-th anniversary of the loss of the freighter Edmund Fitzgerald, which sank in a Lake Superior storm off Whitefish Point in 1975. Memorial services are planned today around the state for the captain and crew that were lost in the tragedy, immortalized in song by Canadian folk-singer Gordon Lightfoot and still recalled when November storms roll across the Great Lakes. None of the 29 on board has ever been recovered and the bodies are believed to be entombed within the wreck. At 7 o’clock this evening, the Great Lakes Shipwreck Museum at Whitefish Point will hold its 15th annual Edmund Fitzgerald Memorial Service. In honor of the 29 lost crew members, the bell, from the ship, is rung 29 times, with a 30th ring for all mariners lost on the Great Lakes.


A CLOSER LOOK AT THE LEGEND OF THE EDMUND FITZGERALD.

FRED STONEHOUSE.

Maritime Historian Fred Stonehouse of Marquette joined us on the “Mark & Walt in the Morning” show to discuss the significance of the Fitzgerald in Great Lakes history and to analyze why this particular shipwreck has evolved into legend.  He raises some very interesting points in the conversation and also brings an historical perspective to the table.  It’s definitely worth giving it a listen.

To listen to the complete interview from the show, please click “HERE“.  To log on to Fred Stonehouse’s website for more about his writings and research about shipwrecks and many other aspects about Great Lakes maritime history, click “HERE“.

REMEMBER THOSE WHO WE HAVE LOST TO THE LAKES.

On this day of commemorating the men lost on the Edmund Fitzgerald, the ship’s bell ringing ceremony serves two important purposes.  One is to honor the 29 men lost on the Fitz, and the second is to remember and honor ALL men and women who have lost their lives on the Great Lakes.  Their memory is symbolized in the ringing of the bell for the 30-th time.  Remember them all today with respect, honor and dignity.  And above all, honor and respect the Great Lakes for their power and majesty.

RESPECTFULLY,

-Walt